Air Force Has a New Cyber Security Defence Plan

Cyber Security Lessons from the U.S. Air Force

Of all the branches in the United States armed services, the Air Force is known to always be at the forefront of information technology, particularly in terms of cybersecurity. Over the next few years, the Air Force will augment its cyber defence systems with advanced cloud protection, real-time alerts and automated responses to security incidents.

The Air Force has realized that the current cybersecurity climate calls for appropriate defence measures, and this is something that American business owners should learn from. The theft and subsequent leak of cyberweapons developed by the National Security Agency is an issue that the Air Force has acknowledged as being dangerous; since these advanced hacking tools are now in the hands of cybercrime groups, all business and non-profit organizations should keep in mind.

Air Force Has a New Cyber Security Defence Plan

Modern cybersecurity strategies involve more than just firewalls and antivirus software. The Air Force is implementing measures such as constant monitoring, real-time automated responses, alerts, and multi-factor authentication; these same measures can be adopted by small business owners at reasonable costs and scale, the idea is to not fall behind the times with regard to information security.

Government of Canada issues cyber security guide for Small-Medium sized Businesses

Many small and mid-sized businesses are concerned about encountering cyber security breaches because they don’t have the budget to hire infosec professionals to monitor their infrastructure. As a solution, the Canadian government issued a guide on baseline Cyber Security controls for SMBs. One example would be to automate software updates in a single patch.

While it’s true that there’s lots of information tailored to large organizations for troubleshooting their security management programs, SMBs are unable to utilize those measures without running into cyber attacks that would endanger their IT databases. What they require is a full-packaged protection system, divided into organizational and baseline controls. Data can be stored safely if an SMB installs anti-malware, user ID verification, and security settings on all their devices including mobile phones and tablets.

Another suggestion involves training employees about recognizing security risks and how to respond in case of a lockdown emergency. In a small organization, the primary goal should be about assigning members to communicate with customers, other employees, and even investors in case something does go wrong. Or at least before a significant incident damages public security.

Cyber Security Guide for Small-Businesses

New Iran Cyber Attacks will Target Android Apps

Cybersecurity experts are warning that Iran is preparing cyber attacks against mobile device users. Ransomware and malware attacks are expected to target mobile Android-based devices. Users should be especially cautious toward unofficial markets that offer Android apps.

Accenture iDefense wrote in a recent cyber threat report that its intelligence team has measured a “significant uptick” in cyber attack campaigns launched from Iran. The report, titled “Cyber Threatscape Report 2018,” expects these attacks to increase in frequency into 2019.

Both state actors and Iranian hacktivists seem to favor attacking apps that are unverified by the Google app store. These attacks seek to plant malware into mobile devices. Buyers should also be forewarned that Iranian hackers are working to plant malicious code into verified apps at the Google store, Accenture wrote.

The cybersecurity company is tracking an Iranian gang called Pipefish. This group is attacking organizations in the Middle East for espionage purposes. The attack could target Israel, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and other countries that supported the US and its decision to cancel the controversial Iran nuclear accord.

Pipefish has developed a toolbox that exploits machines to carry out remote execution commands. The gang has apparently used a crypto-jacking exploit that has already shut down or disrupted Middle East pipelines and facilities.

Tehran Iran

Ransomware, though, appears to be the tool of choice from Iran, Accenture wrote. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard is the main actor in the use of ransomware.

According to the cybersecurity analysis, the ransomware attackers will demand crypto ransoms – payment in Bitcoin. One ransomware called “Black Ruby” scrambles and encrypts files and demands $650 in crypto-coin BTC.

The impetus behind this latest cyber warfare appears to be that the Iranian mullahs and the country’s criminal class are angry that the United States is clamping sanctions on the country again. The sanctions will hit Iran hard in its wallet. Thus, Iranian state actors and the criminal element will use cyber attacks to steal cash.

People who download Android apps, especially from unapproved sources, should exercise extreme caution. Cybersecurity experts are warning that the Iranians are on the prowl, looking for ways to snatch cash from Android users.